Nau mai, haere mai, welcome to EyeContact. You are invited to respond to reviews and contribute to discussion by registering to participate.

JH

Kiwi Visitors to the East

AA
View Discussion
Installation of Visiting Asia at Te Tuhi. In the centre is  Jade Townsend, Ancient, 2014, LED light, 500 x 240 x 800 mm. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Sam Hartnett Ben Buchanan, #2 and #3, 2013, vinyl on board, 1500 x 2444 mm each. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Sam Hartnett Steve Carr, Milk and Honey 1-4, 2010, digital photographic prints, 1090 x 1035 mm each. Courtesy of the artist and Michael Lett. Photo: Sam Hartnett Reuben Paterson, Dancing in September, 2013; Erica van Zon: 12 Chinese Children's Ride Characters, 2011; Chinese Charm Chain, 2011; Kerry Ann Lee, Big City rising, 2013; Matthew Cowan, Kazu Geiko, 2013; Ben Buchanan, #2 and #3, 2013. Photo: Sam Hartnett Erica van Zon: 12 Chinese Children Ride Characters, 2011; Chinese Charm Chain, 2011; Fringe #1, 2011; Kerry Ann Lee, Big City Rising, 2013. Photo: Sam Hartnett Erica van Zon: 12 Chinese Children Ride Characters, 2011; Chinese Charm Chain, 2011; Steve Carr, Milk and Honey 1-4, 2010. Photo: Sam Hartnett Reuben Paterson: Heirloom, 2013; Dancing in September, 2013; Erica van Zon, 12 Chinese Children's Ride Characters, 2011. Photo: Sam Hartnett Erica van Zon, Chinese Charm Chain, 2011. Photo: Sam Hartnett Fiona Amundsen & Tim Corballis, Machine Wind, 2015, single channel HD video. Photo: Sam Hartnett. Fiona Amundsen & Tim Corballis, Machine Wind, 2015, single channel HD video. Photo: Sam Hartnett Kushana Bush, Female Hungry Ghost with Dragonfly Jar, 2009, gouache and pencil on paper,  555 x 715 mm. Courtesy of the artist and Brett McDowell Gallery. Kushana Bush, Hungry Ghost with Chaekkori Boxes, 2009, gouache and pencil on paper, 2009, 555 x 715 mm, private collection. Reuben Paterson, Heirloom, 2013; Ben Buchanan, #2 and #3, 2013; Jae Hoon Lee, Dumbbell, 2014; three works by Kushana Bush; Erica van Zon, !2 Chinese children's Ride Characters, 2011; Chinese Charm Chain, 2011; Steve Carr, Milk and Honey 1-4, 2010. Jae Hooh Lee, Dumbbell, 2014, detail. Photo: Sam Hartnett Matthew Cowan, Kazu Geiko, 2013, still, dual channel synchronised HD video. Matthew Cowan, Kazu Geiko, 2013, still, dual channel synchronised HD video. Liyen Chong, Variegated Groups of Men, 2013, Aum, um.., 2013, painting on photo rag inkjet prints, 240 x 639 x 35 mm, courtesy of the artist and Melanie roger Gallery. Reuben Paterson: Heirloom, 2013; Dancing in September, 2013. Photo: Sam Hartnett Tim J Veling, Untitled #15, from Sapporo, White, 2012, duotran prints and LED lightbox, 600 x 750 mm. Collection of artist. Tim J Veling, Untitled #2, from Sapporo, White, 2012, duotran prints and LED lightbox, 600 x 750 mm. Collection of artist Kare Woods, Burning Event Xiamen Dada, 2013, c-type print on archival rag paper, 900 x 1250 mm. Courtesy of the artist and Bartley and Company, Wellington

These contributions are consistently good and yet not necessarily coherent as a group. Although fragmented - these artists (of varied practice types and interests) have had studios in countries as disparate as China, Indonesia, India, Japan, Taiwan and South Korea - the show is exciting: a mixed bag in the best possible sense.

Auckland

 

Fiona Amundsen & Tim Corballis; Ben Buchanan; Kushana Bush; Steve Carr; Liyen Chong; Matthew Cowan; Kerry Ann Lee; Reuben Paterson; Jade Townsend; Tim Veling; Kate Woods; Erica van Zon
Visiting Asia


Based on Imagine Asia: organised by Pataka Art + Museum
Exhibition design: Andrew Kennedy

 

14 November - 21 February 2016

In this presentation of work from a dozen artists who have benefitted from the connections and funding of the Asia New Zealand Foundation, we find contributions that are consistently good and yet not necessarily coherent as a group. Although fragmented - these artists (of varied practice types and interests) have had studios in countries as disparate as China, Indonesia, India, Japan, Taiwan and South Korea - the show is exciting: a mixed bag in the best possible sense.

The moving image and photography component is especially impressive. Machine Wind, Fiona Amundsen and Tim Corballis’s film (screening in an adjacent room) I consider to be the show’s highlight, a fascinating examination of the rise of Japanese militarism in the late thirties, looking at the theories of Marxist philosopher, Tosaka Jun, his words (recited and discussed by Corballis) presented alongside archival film footage of Japanese military operations, and images of a military shrine in Singapore. This work follows on from Amundsen‘s dynamic show, The Imperial Body, at the Gus Fisher last June. Machine Wind can be viewed online here.

Jae Hoon Lee has two video screens butted together featuring male and female performers lifting dumbbells, but split so each screen has half a figure exercising their single arm with the weights. We don’t see coordinated lifting with both arms simultaneously. That lack of unity could be the reason they are here called dumbbells not barbells, for they are cast in the shape of pairs of Buddha heads: one in bronze, the other in volcanic ash and resin.

How does one interpret this fragmented activity, choice of materials, and possibly loaded title? Perhaps the work attacks the value of Buddhism as a social force that acknowledges both the heavenly and the earthbound? Or maybe the work does the opposite, and is like a Zen koan that promotes action that is free from the logic of thought or patterns of language - subverting the tyranny of the intellect by putting the body into automatic pilot?

Another fascinating video with paired screens comes from Matthew Cowan, with synchronised footage of two Japanese sportswomen practising golf swings and archery. Focussing on methods of fine tuning in order to achieve projectile accuracy, the video dwells on their patience, use of repetition, and positioning of a ‘mental’ target - to counter factors like wind or long distance.

Steve Carr contributes a sequence of four consecutive photographs, impassive self portraits but with an increasing number of shuttlecocks jammed into his mouth, that seems to be making a joke about sport and multi-lingualism. In these elegant but strangely disturbing images - they are subtly violent but symmetrically perfect - the sports equipment seems to double as a kind of feathery megaphone, or horn for verbal enunciation.

Christchurch photographer Tim Veling presents two photographs in glowing lightboxes, taken of villages and pathways in snowy Japanese landscapes. The detail and visual acuity of the local vegetation in these images startles. One photo has rushes and grasses poking out of a snowy bank but they look graphic and flat, as if rendered in an illustration.

Kushana Bush’s elegantly decorative gouaches on paper have the same delicacy, lots of intricate (or intimate) detail you can zero in on, a Klimtlike fussiness and elongation mixed with humour that comments on post-coital exhaustion. Ben Buchanan’s related vinyl-tape ‘paintings’ show no such restraint, and may look like pixelated mandalas, but in reality are central-state vulvas. Their large size, hot colours and hot subject-matter aggressively celebrate the power of the feminine.

The photographed collages of Kate Woods have a different type of politic. They look at the work of the radical Chinese Xiamen Dada group and their bonfires of their own artworks, but with her own motifs as well incorporated into a ‘documentation’ of their hardhitting performance/installation.

Erica van Zon’s colourful works feature small ceramic hybrid animals and apparent versions of Chinese supplicatory fetishism, suspended entreaties to ancestors using plastic chains, small dolls and clustered threads. Her sculptures to western eyes look exuberant and cheerful, the visual equivalent of fire crackers: loud with impact.

This show offers a rich selection of highly evocative items to think about. Some, like Reuben Paterson’s glitter covered synthetic plants, are well known, and are possibly over-exposed now. Most however, will surprise, inform and/or delight.

John Hurrell

Print | Facebook | Twitter | Email

 

Recent Posts by John Hurrell

JH
From Scratch: 546 Moons, as installed in Gallery One at Te Uru. Photo: Sam Hartnett

From Scratch Survey

TE URU

Titirangi

 

From Scratch
546 Moons


3 March - 27 May 2018.

JH
Alfredo Jaar, Other People Think, 2012, light box with black and white transparency. Chartwell Collection, Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki, purchased 2016

Reason and Sentience in Others

AUCKLAND ART GALLERY TOI O TAMAKI

Auckland

 

International contemporary collection sampler
Other People Think


10 March -10 June 2018

JH
Imogen Taylor, Imposter Syndrome, 2017, acrylic on canvas; Isobel Thom, Stacking Storage Boxes, Teapot, Cup and Trivet, Bottle Bell, Geodesic Cup and Salt Pigs. Photo: Sam Hartnett

Taylor, Cochran and Thom

TE URU

Titirangi

 

Imogen Taylor (with Vita Cochran and Isobel Thom)
Pocket Histories,

 

10 February —13 May 2018

JH
Natasha Matila-Smith (all 2018, poly-velvet blend, spray paint):  The Scent of You Stays With Me; His Lips Pink and Swollen; Spaghetti, Alone.

Bad Education

ST PAUL St Gallery

Auckland

 

Louisa Afoa, Natasha Matila-Smith, Molly Rangiwai-McHale, Faith Wilson
Between You and Me

 

19 April - 1 June 2018