Nau mai, haere mai, welcome to EyeContact. You are invited to respond to reviews and contribute to discussion by registering to participate.

JH

Podmore Drawing/Text

AA
View Discussion
Connah Podmore, The body also holds mine, 2019, charcoal on paper. Detail. As installed on Te Tuhi's Drawing Wall. Photo: Sam Hartnett Connah Podmore, The body also holds mine, 2019, charcoal on paper. As installed on Te Tuhi's Drawing Wall with adjacent text. Photo: Sam Hartnet Connah Podmore, The body also holds mine, 2019, charcoal on paper. As installed on Te Tuhi's Drawing Wall with adjacent text. Photo: Sam Hartnet Connah Podmore, The body also holds mine, 2019, charcoal on paper. As installed on Te Tuhi's Drawing Wall with adjacent text. Photo: Sam Hartnet Connah Podmore, The body also holds mine, 2019, charcoal on paper. As installed on Te Tuhi's Drawing Wall with adjacent text. Photo: Sam Hartnet

The light advances to the right on a diagonal vector, pushing out from the grey rectangle's top lefthand corner. Mingled with this illusory illumination is the natural daylight penetrating the Te Tuhi building through the large lefthand glass window, and the occasional ‘hot spot' of the Te Tuhi spotlights in the middle of the top edge. The overall texture is like soft felt; the paper seems to have been lovingly caressed. It looks stroked and patted.

Te Tuhi’s Drawing Wall

Auckland

 

Connah Podmore
This Body Also Holds Mine

 

9 June - 11 August 2019

Wellington artist and writer, Connah Podmore, presents a large charcoal drawing on folded paper (drawn on, rubbed in, rubbed out, and partially erased) that has been opened out and glued on to the wall.

Placed next to it is a text by the artist about the work’s origins. In her poem she incorporates fragments from virtuoso writers Maggie Nelson and Alice Notley, both quotations found in Nelson’s stunning book, The Argonauts.

The ‘body’ of the title seems to be that of her clinging sleeping baby son, whose room provides the wall on which early morning light has traversed and been subsequently rendered, but it also could be the three dimensional Te Tuhi architectural space (in which it sits) as a kind of enclosing vessel.

The light advances to the right on a diagonal vector, pushing out from the grey rectangle’s top lefthand corner. Mingled with this illusory illumination is the natural daylight penetrating the Te Tuhi building through the large lefthand glass window, and the occasional ‘hot spot’ of the Te Tuhi spotlights in the middle of the top edge. The overall texture is like soft felt; the paper seems to have been lovingly caressed. It looks stroked and patted.

In fact it looks like a blanket; nice and warm and cosy. On cold winter mornings it beckons; to get out of the draught from the nearby door you want to lift up a lower corner and slide your body underneath. To wrap the drawing and wall around you.

In a sense the piecemeal text on the right is inseparable from the adjacent (almost holiistic) charcoal drawing. It is a meditation on maternal bonding and two-way need. Both elements—with their use of cumulative process—are sort of drawings and both are kind of texts.

Maybe drawing and text are tropes for mother and son. Perhaps there is a parallel. It seems to be implied. And that light is a metaphor for bonding love—a package that brings mother, child, drawing, text, love and light all together.

John Hurrell

Print | Facebook | Twitter | Email

 

Recent Posts by John Hurrell

JH
Installation of Julia Morison's Head[case] in Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu. Photo by John Collie courtesy of the artist and Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu

Histrionic But Surgically Playful Morison

OBJECTSPACE

Auckland

 

Julia Morison
Head[case]

7 December 2019 - 29 February 2020

JH
Vanessa Crofskey, smoke signals, 2019, (install view) commissioned by Te Tuhi, Auckland. Photo by Sam Hartnett

Crofskey on Reeves Road

TE TUHI CENTRE FOR THE ARTS

Pakuranga


Vanessa Crofskey
smoke signals


8 December 2019 - 16 March 2020

JH
Karen Rubado, under intense scrutiny, 2019, soft plastic weave, commissioned by Te Tuhi, Auckland. Image courtesy of Karen Rubado. Photo: Sam Hartnett

Karen Rubado’s Giant ‘Drawn’ Scarf

TE TUHI CENTRE FOR THE ARTS

Pakuranga

 

Karen Rubado
Under Intense Scrutiny

 

8 December 2019 - 15 March 2020

JH
Colin McCahon, Titirangi, 1956-1957, Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki, gift of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Wellington, 2002. Courtesy of the Colin McCahon Research and Publication Trust.

Options of Interpretation: Was McCahon a Teaser?

AUCKLAND ART GALLERY TOI O TAMAKI

Auckland

 

Colin McCahon in Auckland
A Place to Paint

10 August 2019 - 27 January 2010