Nau mai, haere mai, welcome to EyeContact. You are invited to respond to reviews and contribute to discussion by registering to participate.

HA

Remembered Space and Psychic Residues

AA
View Discussion
Installation of 'Something felt, something shared' at Enjoy. Installation of 'Something felt, something shared' at Enjoy. Gabrielle Amodeo, The Floor We Walk On (from an open love letter) Kayla Ward, The Ghost of William Harper Clare Hartley McLean, Vibrational Counsel (the adventure of you) Ruby Joy Eade, all-that-is-not-me Ruby Joy Eade, all-that-is-not-me

Activated by the body either through physical contact with the audience or through physical labour, 'Something felt, something shared' highlights the intersection of different sensory experiences, memories and empathy. Each work emphasises the emotional relationships our bodies form with space and other people. These are explored both through physical processes and in a digital capacity, using memories from within the contemplated living spaces.

Wellington

 

Gabrielle Amodeo, Ruby Joy Eade, Clare Hartley McLean, Kayla Ward
Something felt, something shared
Curated by Emma Ng

 

7 May - 30 May, 2015

Activated by the body either through physical contact with the audience or through physical labour, Something felt, something shared highlights the intersection of different sensory experiences, memories and empathy. Each work emphasises the emotional relationships our bodies form with space and other people. These are explored both through physical processes and in a digital capacity, using memories from within the contemplated living spaces. Something felt, something shared seeks to make these experiences tangible, whether they be encounters with ghosts, or searching through a series of obscure online forums. There is something deeply intimate about these artworks, a sense gathered from the way one could relate to these personal narratives, particularly in terms of one’s own body and experiences.

Gabrielle Amodeo’s contribution consists of a number of large facsimile floorplans, created when she mapped out the floor of every room of a house she and her partner used to live in. One of these, a map of the entrance, is placed on the floor. It plays off nicely within the space, as it is the first work one encounters in the show. Although it took me some time to register exactly what this work was, as soon as it became apparent it made me think of my own home and other spaces where I have lived. To the side was a series of bound folders containing outlines of the entire house. The process of documenting this space made me think of her body creating these rubbings, the emptying of the rooms and fragments of memory one experiences in different spaces, especially in locations we inhabit daily for long periods of time.

Kayla Ward’s work is a sound recording played through a radio, based upon a strange encounter from her childhood. During her childhood Ward encountered what she thought was a ghost. After some research she discovered information about a man who had lived in her room in the 19th century. His name was Pvt. William Harper and he died whilst biking from Scott Street to Hamner Street in Christchurch. The work consists of Ward recreating this journey, by pedalling along the same route and making a sound recording of this process. While learning about the creation of this work I recalled a ghostly encounter I myself had as a child and my own questioning of this experience. How do we make eerily uncertain memories tangible and not exist only as fledging sentience?(1)

Clare Hartley McLean’s Vibrational Counsel (The adventure of you) is a work physically activated by the body. One must download a QR code reader on a smart phone in order to listen to a series of texts spoken by McLean. These texts are a series of psychic energy readings. The ones I took home could well have applied to anyone, but I felt personally validated by what I had picked up. It had relevance to the current stage of my life and made me think of the dismissive way in which we treat psychics and/or horoscopes or non-human entities. Those things we can’t explain, even though they do make sense, perhaps because they are simply universal truths applicable to anyone.

Is the internet making me depressed? (2) This is one of hundreds of sentiments gleaned from various social media and online forums by Ruby Joy Eade. These are presented as a series of publications designed to be touched, picked up and read. Eade’s work is embedded with empathy, whilst harbouring an affinity with our digital life - in terms of having a need to connect. It questions whether we are able to establish an authentic ‘connection’ with other people through virtual means. These trains of thought create poetic parallels within all aspects of our lives, from questions surrounding the validity of our personal relationships to whether we deserve happiness. Many of these poetic fragments are also universal. They highlight a recurrent theme throughout Something felt, something shared - the need to make the seemingly intangible into a physicalised object, as a means of creating intimacy.

Hana Aoake

(1) Emma Ng, wall text for Something felt, something shared (2015).

(2)  Ruby Joy Eade, Something borrowed, something shared (2015).

Print | Facebook | Twitter | Email

 

This Discussion has 2 comments.

Comment

Chloe Geoghegan, 11:36 a.m. 25 May, 2015

Thanks for your insightful review, Hana, it makes me want to see this exhibition. I really enjoy work that makes me wonder about how the artist made it and I think your comment is so on point:

"The process of documenting this space made me think of her body creating these rubbings, the emptying of the rooms and fragments of memory one experiences in different spaces, especially in locations we inhabit daily for long periods of time."

I wonder what your thoughts are on the idea that all artists create work that is experientially intimate? For some reason this reminds me of a work much lest delicate than these: Burden's 1971 'Shoot'. Perhaps even the act of another shooting you as the artist is an intimate process.

Reply to this thread

Hana Aoake, 12:04 p.m. 25 May, 2015

Hi Chloe,

Thanks :)

I'm not sure whether I think that all work that artists make is intimate. I think that work that's related in some way to the body definitely has an intimacy because of our own connection with our own bodies. If that makes sense? I felt a sense of intimacy with each of the works in this show because of the way each work described an experience I had had.

One thing I have been really interested in recently is the intimacy of viewing art online, especially given that I can't go to say the Venice Biennale. It's also kind of essential in NZ because we are so geographically distant from the rest of the world. Yeah that is probably one of my favourite works by Burden.. Very sad to hear of his passing recently.

Reply to this thread

Recent Posts by Hana Aoake

HA
Deanna Dowling, In search of gold, the stone was there all along (2015). Photo: Blue Oyster Gallery

Outside the Gallery

BLUE OYSTER GALLERY

Dunedin

 

Tomas Richards, Robyn Jordaan, Deanna Dowling and Cobi Taylor 
A Tragic Delusion


5 August - 29 August, 2015.

HA
Kate van der Drift, Everything Returns to the Sea, 2014, Giclée photograph on matte paper, 871 mm x 1220 mm

Van der Drift Photos

SANDERSON CONTEMPORARY ART

Auckland

 

Kate van der Drift
Changing shores of shadow

 

2 June - 21 June 2015

HA
Gabriella Mangano and Silvana Mangano, Visible Structures,  2014, installation views, Dunedin Public Art Gallery. Courtesy of the artists and Anna Schwartz Gallery

Gabriella and Silvana Mangano in Dunedin

DUNEDIN PUBLIC ART GALLERY

Dunedin

 

Gabriella Mangano and Silvana Mangano
Visible Structures


29 November 2014 - 15 March 2015

HA
Severine Costa's Put Together at V space. Photo: Ted Whitaker

Severine Costa Performance

V space, Dunedin School of Art

Dunedin

 

Severine Costa
Put Together

 

20 October - 5th November 2014: 1-3 pm daily