Nau mai, haere mai, welcome to EyeContact. You are invited to respond to reviews and contribute to discussion by registering to participate.

JH

The Length and Breadth of the Land

AA
View Discussion
Mark Adams, 25.5.1997. At Tuhawaiki's Memorial Ruapuke Island Silver bromide contact print from 10x8 inch black and white negative printed 1997 Mark Adams, 27.9.1997  At Te Marua - Old Pa. Ngati Koata. Rangitoto - D'Urville Island. 20 x 24 inch silver bromide fibre based print enlarged from 10 x 8 inch black and white negative printed 2013 Mark Adams,18.5.1997. Sylvan Cove Port Pegasus Rakiura.   Silver bromide contact print from 10x8 inch black and white negative printed 1997 Mark Adams, 18.12.1997. At Te Tou Rangatira Whenua. Te Tii Marae Waitangi, Bay of Islands. 20 x 24 inch silver bromide fibre based print enlarged from 10 x 8 inch black and white negatives printed 2013 Mark Adams, 1977. Tangihua Road, Maungakaramea, Northland. 20 x 24 inch silver bromide fibre based print enlarged from 10 x 8 inch black and white negative printed 2013 Mark Adams, Cook's Sites 3 - 10.8.1998 Indian Island, after William Hodges' "View in Dusky Bay"  Gold toned silver bromide fibre-based prints Mark Adams, 5.5.1988 Rakaia River Mouth Moa Hunter Site, Canterbury. Gold toned silver bromide fibre-based prints

What is interesting is the amount of travelling around this country Adams has done over the years. The more remote spots don't seem to have evaded him, for his curiosity about historical events has led him to record a vast range of landforms, many moody and dramatic, even those. Yet these are not his sole form of photographic expression, as his well known coloured architectural and tattoo (more overtly community oriented) works show.

Auckland

 

Mark Adams
Archives

 

8 February - 2 March 2013

The eleven ‘documentary’ landscape images here from Mark Adams‘ photographic archives go back to the late seventies - as created negatives, not prints - and though linked firmly to certain key events in particular locations in this country’s social history, are just as much about Romanticism, light, weather, geology and camera technology as landscape. And as ‘documentary’ is the convenient heading the work is presented under, certain narratives and cultural foci provide three varieties of conceptual underpinning: namely sites linked to the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi, Ngai Tahu sacred sites, and coastal sites visited by Cook.

One photograph doesn’t quite fit in this explanation, but as a 1977 image it marks the start of the artist’s detailed exploration of Aotearoa’s ‘complicated colonial histories’: an exposed wall of an old villa in Maungakaramea in Northland where the April 8 1918 edition of Auckland Weekly Newspaper provided the wallpaper. We see sheets of tattered and layered newsprint, with images of the Tuhoe prophet Rua Kenana and his circular temple Hiona peeping through, a vertical archaeology.

Adams’ Treaty of Waitangi signing sites start with Te Tii Marae Waitangi, Bay of Islands, Hokianga Habour, Rakiura (Stewart) Island and then Rangitoto Ki Te Tonga (D’Urville) Island. The image of Rakiura Island shows Adams’ passion for historical research, with his own interesting observations written on the print and in the gallery catalogue. His comments note that Captain Hobson instructed Major Thomas Bunbury of the HMS Herald ‘to assemble the chiefs whenever an opportunity presents itself, and expound to them the principles on which Her Majesty proposes to extend to this country the advantages of a settled form of civil government, and to obtain the signatures of such as may not have already given their adherence,’ but that Bunbury on Rakiura Island went ahead proclaiming British sovereignty by ‘right of discovery’ of Captain Cook, without visiting any of the Maori settlements on the island.

The other series consists of sites connected to Cook’s second voyage (1772-1775) usually where William Hodges (1744-1797) did sketches that later on back in London he converted into oil paintings. Two of Adam’s images in particular, 17.5.1975 View in Pickersgill Harbour after William Hodges, and 10.8.1998 Indian Island, after William Hodges’ “View in Dusky Bay” are directly connected to two of Hodges‘ most well known paintings.

What is interesting is the amount of travelling around this country Adams has done over the years. The more remote spots don’t seem to have evaded him, for his curiosity about historical events has led him to record a vast range of landforms, many moody and dramatic, even those. Yet these are not his sole form of photographic expression, as his well known coloured architectural and tattoo (more overtly community oriented) works show - only a dominant preoccupation. A modest but fascinating survey.

John Hurrell

Print | Facebook | Twitter | Email

 

Recent Posts by John Hurrell

JH
Runo Lagomarsino, If you don't know what the south is, it's simply because you are from the north, 2009, stack of posters, 42 x 32.5 cm each. Courtesy the artist, Francisca Minini, Milano, Mendes Wood DN, Sao Paulo and Nils Stark. Photo: Sam Hartnett

Southern Lights

TE TUHI CENTRE FOR THE ARTS

Pakuranga

 

International Group Show 
From Where I Stand, My Eye Will Send A Light To You In The North


12 August - 21 October 2018

JH
Hikalu Clark, Accurate Community Projections, 2018, on the reeves Rd billboards. Commissioned by Te Tuhi Auckland. Photo: Sam Hartnett

Site Specific Hoardings

Te Tuhi billboards on Reeves Rd

Pakuranga

 

Hikalu Clarke
Accurate Community Projections

 

12 August -21 October 2018

JH
Benjamin Work's Write it on the land, Seal it on the heart, 2018, as installed on Te Tuhi's Project Wall. Photo: Sam Hartnett

Work’s Revamped Tongan Coat of Arms

Te Tuhi's Project Wall

Pakuranga

 

Benjamin Work
Write it on the land, Seal it on the heart

 

12 August - 21 October 2018

JH
Gary McMillan, Scene 37, 2018, acrylic on linen (framed), 45 x 60 cm

Granular Cityscapes

FOX JENSEN MCCRORY

Auckland


Gary McMillan
Phase IV


23 August - 22 September 2018