Nau mai, haere mai, welcome to EyeContact. You are invited to respond to reviews and contribute to discussion by registering to participate.

JH

Art as Therapy?

AA
View Discussion
Dan Arps' Hobson Gardens installed at Michael Lett Dan Arps' Hobson Gardens installed at Michael Lett Dan Arps, Weak Idea Grid Study 1, 2011, paper, acrylic on canvas, epoxy, steel, wood, 610 x 515 x 65 mm An example of Arps' Diagram Studies taken from Ljiljana Klisic's charts Dan Arps, Painting, 2011, oil on canvas, acrylic, wood, epoxy, 525 x 620 x 60 mm Another one of Arps' Diagram Studies, xerox poster, 1180 x 838 mm Dan Arps, No Title 1 (Hobson Gardens), 2011, mixed media, 420 x 625 x 60 mm Dan Arps,  No Title (Hobson Gardens), 2011, acrylic glass, epoxy, fibreglass, 860 x 620 mm each Dan Arps, Weak Idea Grid Study 11, 2011, aluminium, steel, oil paint, acrylic paint, epoxy, self adhesive vinyl, two pieces -485 x 365 x 60 mm dimensions variable (vinyl) Dan Arps, Diagram Studies, xerox poster, 1180 x 838 mm. Dan Arps, Hobson Gardens at Michael Lett (detail).

With so many paintings consisting of shallow trays of daubs, their containerlike quality becomes a parallel to the cross-sectioned bowl forms of the Klisic diagrams. Such an implied correlation delineates the artist's search for bliss and fulfilment within his practice - referring to himself as self-reflexive but ecstatic throughout the transmuting process.

Auckland

 

Dan Arps
Hobson Gardens

 

25 August - 1 October 2011

It is almost a year after Dan Arps won the Walters Prize and this Lett show is his first major presentation since. Because Michael Lett’s new gallery has a very different ambience from his old K’ Rd space and from Gambia Castle, this exhibition feels more expansive bodily, and more compacted conceptually. Other than the tight sculpture exhibition he did for Stephen Cleland’s Unpacking My Library show at Te Tuhi, this display is unusually focussed.

As a project the show’s sculpture and painting seems to be embedded in notions of Reichian psychotherapy. Eight posters from the website of Czech Radix therapist Ljiljana Klisic are scattered on the floor and another is on a nearby wall, and the paintings, while typically resisting the conventions of ‘normal’ painting with their pictorial structure and sometimes peculiar materials, do contain loaded symbolism that refers to orgasm, symbolic bodily confinement (with oppressive anxieties) and blissful release from the isolated self. Grids of steel rods act as foils to painted patches of liberating blue sky and adhesive vinyl rectangles of yellow sunlight.

These paintings are often smeared with stringy, puttylike concoctions, as if scraped out of a bucket of semi-solid, fibrous chewing gum. Sometimes they are reversed so the back is at the front with texted collage, plaster and medical gauze stuck over the stretcher bars, or else made of thin ‘whiteboards’, their transparent glass rear surfaces scratched and stained with smudged colour. These paste-wiped planes with pressed putty frames - and sculptures on stands with epoxy gunk globbed onto draped garments (wrapped in chains) or prickly plastic cacti complete with dangling green lights - look appealingly repulsive, so ruinously incoherent and decrepit as to form their own art historical genre, thus becoming reborn as ‘beauty’, reinvigorated and delectable.

With so many paintings consisting of shallow trays of daubs, their containerlike quality becomes a parallel to the cross-sectioned bowl forms of the Klisic diagrams. Such an implied correlation delineates the artist’s search for bliss and fulfilment within his practice - referring to himself as self-reflexive but ecstatic throughout the transmuting process.

One large projecting painting is a thick white and purple hardboard box with two sprayed vertical slot eyes, an inverted curving frown and a crack where it has been punched. Assuming that this item is a self portrait then the show comes across as a methodical search for self love. The show’s strange title, Hobson’s Gardens, with its allusion to Hobson’s Choice, implies Arps has had no option but to act from necessity to tend to his artworks and himself as needy gardens.

As for ecstasy - in what way you might wonder? Are we thinking coital (in terms of bodily pleasure), or is it simply the immense pleasure artists have planning and creating works? Or is it social (more community oriented, the mingling of the ‘art tribe’), or even mystical with cosmic dimensions?

Or is Arps just having a laugh placing these nifty looking posters amongst his unusually ‘anti-aesthetic’ or calculatedly ‘ugly’ works, hoping convincing connections will burst forth from possibly over-imaginative interpreters. Like say Vicente Todoli, or gulp..yours truly.

I think this show is Arps at his smartest and tightest. (I won’t say most candid because I have no idea. I don’t know him well enough to be able to answer that.) Nevertheless it’s essential viewing.

John Hurrell

Print | Facebook | Twitter | Email

 

Recent Posts by John Hurrell

JH
Nicola Jackson's The Bloggs, as installed at Centre for Contemporary Art Toi Moroki. Photo by Rachel King

Nicola Jackson Installation at CoCA

CENTRE OF CONTEMPORARY ART TOI MOROKI

Christchurch

 

Nicola Jackson
The Bloggs

 

22 August - 18 November 2018

JH
Through the window: Olyvia Hong: Breeding Negotiations --Once you've done a bit of winning, the bug has bitten, 2018, screen print on polyvinyl acetate; Play with control, 2018, plastic and ceramic dog figures. Photo: Sam Hartnett

New Talent at Artspace

ARTSPACE

Auckland

 

Tyson Campbell, Wai Ching Chan, Faamele Etuale, Olyvia Hong, Bronte Perry
The River Remains; ake tonu atu

 

15 September - 20 October 2018

JH
Installation view of Steve Carr: Chasing the Light 2018. 6-channel video installation. Commissioned by Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū. Steve Carr is represented by Michael Lett, Auckland, and STATION, Melbourne

Steve Carr as Trickster

CHRISTCHURCH ART GALLERY TE PUNA O WAIWHETU

Christchurch

 

Steve Carr
Chasing The Light

 

8 September 2018 - 10 February 2019

JH
John Stezaker, Blind (Film Portrait Collage) VIII, 2017, collage, 25.3 x 20.3 cm, courtesy of The Approach

Stezaker in Auckland

STARKWHITE

Auckland

 

John Stezaker
John Stezaker: Collages

 

9 October - 3 November 2018